Author: Carefree Animal Dentistry

On the surface, anesthetic-free dental cleanings might appear as an attractive alternative, eliminating the risks related to anesthesia and being pocket-friendly. The procedure entails holding the pet in place while eradicating visible tartar and plaque from the teeth, often resulting in a superficial improvement in...

The thought of taking your feline companion to a dentist may seem odd at first, as we often correlate dental care with human health. However, dental health is a significant aspect of overall well-being for all creatures, and that includes our feline friends. Hence, the...

A board-certified veterinary dentist is a highly trained professional who has pursued advanced education and achieved certification in the specialized field of veterinary dentistry. These individuals have undergone rigorous training and met stringent requirements to obtain their certification, making them experts in diagnosing, preventing, and...

As veterinary dental specialists, we are often asked “How can my dog eat with missing teeth?” Our typical response is that they will most likely eat better without the diseased and painful teeth. Dogs are known for their sharp teeth and powerful jaws, which they...

Root canal therapy is a non-invasive and painless method that can save teeth in dogs. It has a success rate of around 96% and requires less recovery time compared to extractions(1). The term “root canal” is a colloquialism for endodontic therapy. For the purposes of this...

What is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease is the inflammation and infection of the specialized structures that surround and support the tooth (gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone). By two years of age, 70% of cats and 80% of dogs have some form of periodontal disease.  Considering...

Any abnormal growth in the mouth and the surrounding tissue is considered an oral mass. The tissues involved can be maxillo-facial bones (maxilla, mandible, facial, nasal, zygomatic, temporal, palatal bones), the temporomandibular joint, or soft tissues like gums, tongue, cheeks, lips, tonsils, palate, salivary glands,...

Isn't it funny that we humans rarely notice our own bad breath? It is clearly obvious that our beloved dogs and cats are the same.  Have you ever heard of your doggie’s housemate complain of bad breath or say, ‘go brush before I kiss you’?...